BEST TREATMENTS TO KEEP HYDRANGEAS LOOKING GREAT

1)  If Hydrangea blooms arrive directly from the grower or if blooms have been dry-packed for two days or more, Chrysal Professional 1 is the best way to turn on the flow.

  • Prep buckets with cold water and correctly dose Chrysal Professional 1.
  • Remove water/gel baggie (or cotton) from stem ends. Wash off any gel stuck to stem.
  • With sharp and clean shears, cut 1-2 inches.
  • Cut above old (brown) stem tissue. These blooms only drink efficiently through new (green) stem tissues.
  • Allow time. A quick dip in Alum powder or an instant hydrator doesn’t give sustained results.
  • Let blooms drink in Professional 1 for a minimum of 4 hrs up to 3 days.
  • Once fully hydrated-transfer to Chrysal Professional 2 or vase solution Professional 3.

2)  If blooms arrive in buckets, Professional 2 is the solution of choice.

  • Prepare buckets with cold water and Professional 2.
  • Check stem ends and remove water baggies. Wash off any gel stuck to stems.
  • Give a fresh cut into green tissues. Sugars in Professional 2 solution keep flowers turgid.
  • Allow plenty of room so moisture on florets evaporate BEFORE moving flowers into cooler.

CLEMATIS CARE

  • Prep bucket with Chrysal Professional 1 solution.
  • Use COLD water.
  • Follow dosing instructions (2ml/liter).
  • Remove any gel baggies or wet cotton on stem ends. Rinse off gel.
  • With a sharp, clean knife cut off 1 inch from stems.
  • Let flowers hydrate overnight BEFORE using in arrangements and design work.
  • No foam. Do not crush, boil or burn stems.
  • Avoid dripping on blooms.

 

Image Courtesy of iGarden

Image Courtesy of iGarden


Weddings are an all around joyous occasion with many beautiful and memorable moments. One moment that always stands out is when the gorgeous bride takes her stride down the aisle. Last time we blogged about the current trending cascade bouquet. As beautiful as these oversized and long bouquets are, they are not for everyone. An option to consider is the glamelia or composite bouquet.

Glamelias or composite bouquets are made of many petals from different flowers to form one large one. The name itself originated from the 1940’s and 50’s. During the war, camelia blooms were too expensive.  So people took the petals of the less expensive gladiolas and made them into what looked like the more expensive flower (via First Come Flowers).

Whichever bridal bouquet you choose to go with, it’s important to keep them looking fresh. Especially with light colored bouquets where wilting is more noticeable, try Chrysal Professional Glory a unique holding spray that helps to retain essential moisture within the cut flower or foliage without the need for extra hydration. When used in place of traditional water, misting will retard deterioration and keep flowers and leaves firm.


To achieve a long vase life, removing the thorns is not recommended. Every wound on the stem leads to deterioration of the stem bark and the loss of cell moisture, resulting in major container/vase contamination. This results in wilted leaves, very little or no flower development and turbid, smelly containers and vases. With Rosa it can even lead to the manifestation of bent-neck.

VASE LIFE TESTS

Roses with thorns last longer in the vase than roses without thorns. When flower food is added to the vase water, the differences disappear. However, the vase water of roses without thorns does remain turbid.

 VASE LIFE KILLERS

 The only excuse for removing thorns is to make arranging easier and protect the hands if no gloves are used. If you have to,  remove the thorns with as little damage to the tissue as possible. The consumer can best remove them by breaking them off by hand, pushing them aside. All other methods of using knives and thorn removers are harmful to the flower.


If stems have been out of water for any amount of time, it is always a good idea that they be cut. Three benefits to cutting stems are the removal of micro-orgasnisms, contamination and air bubbles from the stem.
          • After the grower has cut the flower off its mother plant, the stem immediately begins to heal itself, much like a wound on our skin. The scab on human skin protects against infections from outside sources and stops the bleeding. The stem protects itself in a similar way against infections and drying out through the cutting wound by sealing it. This means that when cut flowers are put into a container or vase solution, the water absorption is greatly decreased or even completely stopped, resulting in limp, weak flowers and ultimately the wilting and premature demise of the entire flower.
          • Micro-organisms can be found everywhere, on flower stems and leaves, the cut surface, containers, vases tools and work tables. Wounds on the stem bark are an excellent food source for micro-organisms. They only grow if they have something to feed on in the container or vase. Large amounts can cause loss of quality in some cut flowers, because they can partially plug the bottom of the stem. This is one of the main reasons to cut off a piece of the stem after a ‘dry’ period and it also prevents contamination of the container or vase.
          • Contaminated and organic materials plug up the cut surface, just like air-bubbles in a dried out stem-end. This also causes the premature wilting of the cut flowers. By cutting the bottom of the stem (by at least 2-5 cm) these blockages are removed. No flower food will remove this kind of infection from the stems.

OTHER TIPS

If cut flowers have been dry for more than 30 minutes, cut off a part of the stem before placing them in a container or vase. This applies to all phases of the flower’s life.

Working in a clean environment, removing contamination and avoiding stem damage all help to prevent waste, save money and ensure normal flower development as well as a satisfied customer.

Removing all contamination and blockages often requires cutting 5-10 cm off the stem. Remember that no flower food can remove infections in the stem.

Cutting at an angle of about 45 degrees creates the cleanest cut surface and least stem damage.

 


Last year an estimated $1.9 billion dollars were spent on flowers for Valentine’s Day. With such a large amount of money being spent on this holiday, it is important that your flowers are being properly handled. Ensure your investment and provide the customer with the highest quality possible by following these proven rose handling techniques.
GENERAL
                                                        • Do not drop boxes on pallet or floor in order to avoid impact damage and internal bruising
                                                        • Stack boxes on top of pallets in cooler to maximize air flow and also prevent soggy bottoms
                                                        • Allow roses to drink water 1 – 2 hours before sales display
                                                        • Place roses to top shelves away from drip areas to lessen the chance of Botrytis
                                                        • Soak foam, fill vases with Chrysal Rose Pro Vase so flowers stand tall to the end

DRY PACK PROCESSING

                                                          • Store boxes at 34 – 38F. Avoid fluctuating temperatures in order to reduce excessive condensation
                                                          • Remove ONLY as many boxes as you can process within 30 – 60 minutes
                                                          • Fill buckets with Chrysal Professional #1 or Professional #2
                                                          • Measure when mixing solutions
                                                          • Clean buckets, clean cutters, clean solution
                                                          • Let bunches sit outside cooler (in sleeves) for 30 minutes to allow condensation to evaporate
                                                          • Remove only foliage and thorns below water level
                                                          • Hydrate roses for a minimum of 2 – 4 hours before displaying or designing

WET PACK PROCESSING

                                                          • Follow same guidelines as dry pack processing
                                                          • Check solution level on arrival
                                                          • Top up with fresh solution (not tap water), if needed
                                                          • Do not drip on flowers
                                                          • Remove any diseased flowers (Botrytis etc.) 

CUT ROSE CARE TIPS


Flower preparation is just as important as the flower handling itself. Here are 12 flower care tips for Valentine’s, that will ensure longer vase life…

  • Start off with a clean work space and clean materials (buckets, cutters, vases, etc). 
  • Always measure out your solutions correctly. Overdosing or under-dosing wastes time and money.
  • Prep your buckets with COLD water. Pre-chilling buckets a day ahead will work even better.
  • Fill bucket 1/3 full. During holidays, mark bucket with tape for quick filling. 
  • Do not use ice since it dilutes the dosage.
  • Use sharp, clean tools to prevent contamination and maximize solution efficacy.
  • Get stems into solution quickly to reduce air bubbles entering the system. 
  • Never combine the old solution with the fresh new solution.
  • Top-up with flower food solution and not water.
  • Give a fresh cut when you prepare fresh bucket solutions.
  • Keep leaves out of vase water. 
  • Avoid dripping any solution or water on petals and flowers. Try to keep them as dry as possible.
According to the National Retail Federation adults intended to spend an average of $40.20 on flowers for Valentine’s Day. Following these tips and using floral nutrients is a great financial investment and more importantly necessary to preserve your floral reputation.
CUT ROSE CARE TIPS