QUIZ TIME!!!

Here are some questions to test your general knowledge of bulb flower handling.

Q: Should I remove the anthers of lilies to eliminate the possibility of pollen stains and lengthen vase life?

A: Yes and no. Research shows no improvement in vase life when anthers are removed, but plucking anthers definitely helps avoid pollen stains. If pollen does not stain clothing or tablecloths, use tape (masking or scotch tape) to lift the pollen off material. It’s ok to blow it off, but avoid touching or brushing it with hands because oil in our skin sets the pollen into the texture of the material.

Q: How can I get Gladioli and Freesia to open all the way?

A: Process the stems in Chrysal Bulb T-Bag solution. For Glads, carefully snap off an inch off  the stem apex (growth point). This action forces the growth hormone to migrate from the tip of the flower spike down into the buds greatly improving floret opening. Only give Freesia a fresh cut if stems have been out of water more than 4-5 days. Cutting stems, triggers internal ethylene and causes florets to stagnate and blooms to die prematurely. Treat Freesia and glads in Bulb T-Bags. Remove the 1st spent blossom to encourage each floret on the comb to continue opening.

Q: If I pierce tulip stems and add pennies to the water, keep glads in the dark, add gin to the iris buckets, or strip lily foliage, this will maximize vase performance–right?!

A: The cell chemistry in bulbous flowers (including tulips) goes crazy when the flowers are cut from their bulb, corm, rhizome or tuber. Symptoms include: short vase life, florets that start to open, but stagnate instead (Iris, Freesia & Gladioli). Tulip foliage yellows, stems goose-neck and drop petals. Anemones, ranuculas and nerines lose color vibrancy fast. Alstroemeria and lillies suffer premature leaf yellowing. All are symptoms of the imbalance that occurs when bulbous flowers are harvested. These types of flowers don’t really need glucose (sugar) to open. Instead, bulb flowers need  hormone based, rather than sugar-based food. Rebalance the chemistry to avoid the negative symptoms.

Click on video to learn more…

 


Valentine’s Day is on a Sunday this year, that means put on your marketing caps and PROMOTE, PROMOTE & PREPARE WISELY.

Here is a survival countdown for Valentine’s Day that can help you optimize your flowers, staff and most importantly your cost & sales.

Week of January 25—29

  • a) Prepare work schedules. Identify which non-floral associates will help in floral
  • b) Decorate Floral Department
  • c) Complete candy arrangements
  • d) Fill water tubes with Chrysal Professional #2 or save money & time and use Arrive Alive.  Every stem gets hydrated!
  • e) Indentify incremental display location(s)
  • f)Send out a $5 off coupon to customers & remind them to order the flowers early in order to get the best flowers!
  • g) Post “at a glance” instructions for prepping flowers

INSTRUCTIONS INCLUDE–Mix ALL solutions with COLD H2O
o Right solution for the job: Chyrsal Prof #2 for buckets. Pro #3 for vases.
o How deep to fill buckets (1/3—1/2)
o How much to cut off stems (1-2inches)
o How many bunches per bucket
o NOT to strip foliage from stems
o What cooler to store finished products

Week of January 30—Feb 5

  • a) Make sure ALL floral supplies are in. No supply orders during VD week (glass, nutrients, wire, Arrive Alive, Transporters)
  • b) Review VD work schedule / make changes. Staff heaviest for the 14th
  • c) Balloon set-up
  • d) Determine display area for impact items (orchids , tulip pots, etc)
  • e) Upgrade potted. Dust off last year’s left over bows and pouffs
  • f) Make sure wire catalogues are out and everyone knows how to use

Week of February 6—12

  • a) Create balloon bouquets
  • b) Begin fresh arrangement production
  • c) Start pre-greening rose vases. Fill vases with Chrysal Professional #2 or Pro #3.
  • d) Spray pre-green vases with Chrysal leafshine to avoid dehydration.
  • e) Identify space allotments in dairy and produce coolers for arrangements
  • f) Create a coupon for Mother’s Day & make sure it goes out the door with every flower!

February 9

  • a) Communicate to receiving manager and GM how large your in-bound load will be
  • b) Identify where it is to be stored
  • c) Staff heavy to process entire load of dry-pack blooms. Leave NOTHING in boxes!
  • 2 REASONS WHY: 1. So you can inspect the product. 2. Allow time for flowers to hydrate 100%
  • d) Prepare processing buckets using cold water and Chrysal Professional #2
  • e) Teach extra help how to wrap flowers & how to up-sale with Arrive Alive water wrap

February 11

  • a) Mass-produce rose arrangements
  • b) Build displays
  • c) Create a special section for vase-less bouquets, use Arrive Alive to wrap the bouquets and get water out of the buckets! Wet floors are dangerous!

February 12

  • a) Arrange to have all displays completed by noon
  • b) Expand ALL fresh cut displays—get every stem out on the floor

February 13

  • a) Floral managers help customers, NOT run registers!
  • b) Assign someone to refill arrangements with freshly-made Chrysal Pro #2 or Pro#3
  • c) Set up Cupid check out lane at end of day. Prep location with floral wrapping paper & Arrive Alive
  • d) Remind the register people that the holiday is UPC-driven!
  • e) Buy lunch for the entire staff, it doesn’t have to be expensive but it should reflect appreciation and keep everyone in the store

FEBRUARY 14

  • a) Instruct all staff to up-sell EVERYTHING!! Remember–everything in a vase SELLS!
  • b) Remind the customers to use the flower food in order to maximize the vase life of their flowers.

FEBRUARY 15

  • CELEBRATE & BEGIN TO PLAN FOR NEXT YEAR, take notes of what went well & what went wrong.  This is the best time to make notes since the big event is fresh in your memory! 
  • If you have any left over flowers donate them to local hospitals or even give them to your staff as an extra token of appreciation!


We bet you’re not the only one who likes this flower with its wide variety of shapes and colors! There are two types of hydrangea, the spring/summer variation and the classic variation, which blooms from summer through to autumn. If you treat them right, Hydrangeas are very rewarding flowers and they can last for over 3 weeks in an arrangement or a bouquet.

Click to watch video:

The creative part we leave up to you, but here are some tips to enjoy the Hydrangea as long as possible.

1. Hydrangeas have a high energy and water need

Hydrangeas have a very strong transpiration and also need a lot of energy to maintain color and strength. Due to the enormous flower surface and thinness of their petals, the flower will wilt if there is not enough liquid available. If this happens, cut off about 3-4 cm of the stem with a sharp knife and place the flower in a cool, fresh and clean Chrysal Clear Universal flower food solution. This solution quickly hydrates the flower and boosts the energy level of the flower, which is vital for good vase life.

2. Outdoor grown Hydrangeas sometimes have a very wooden stem end

Dutch hydrangeas are produced in greenhouses, and their peak production is in spring until late fall. Abroad they can be grown outdoors and depending on the climate they will be available year-round. Outdoor grown Hydrangeas sometimes have a very wooden stem end. In case the flower starts to wilt, cut off that part of the stem.

3. White Hydrangeas can turn blueish

This is a real nightmare for every florist. White Hydrangeas – most of the time used for weddings – can turn blueish in the centre of the flower when you use a post-harvest product containing Aluminium sulphate. Therefore make sure the flower food or storage solution contains the word “Clear” as in Chrysal Clear Professional 2 for the storage period and Chrysal Clear Universal flower food or Chrysal Clear Professional 3 for the consumer phase.

About the different variations Hydrangeas
The Hydrangeas that are available in spring/summer are mostly uniform in colour and are not left on the plant to mature, instead they are harvested when fully opened. The classic variation, available in summer and autumn, can even last for months: these flowers change color and become papery. The pictures show how the color of a pink variety changes from fresh (2) to classic (4). Picture 1 shows the least vase and is not recommended to use.